What if I experience nuisance wildlife at my home or in my area?

Animal Services will not trap nuisance wildlife that is on your property or that is simply passing through your yard. They will only respond to wildlife that is an immediate threat to personal safety, because it is in the main living space of your home. A nuisance animal is an animal that habitually destroys property. Some animals are exempt from being declared a nuisance, such as all birds of prey (ospreys, eagles, falcons, hawks, etc.), deer, and any animal or reptile protected by the state and/or federal government.

Should you have a reoccurring problem with nuisance wildlife, you may contact the Wildlife Conflict Hotline at 1-855-571-9003 in regards to deterring the species of animal that is concerning you. You may also want to check out the link below from VDWR (Va. Department of Wildlife Resources). It lists many different types of animals and suggests ways to try to keep those animals from continuing to visit your yard. You may also contact a local wildlife removal company to trap the species at a cost to you. A quick search on the internet will give you a list of companies to choose from.

It is important to note that Animal Services also does not collect newborn or orphaned wildlife. You may contact Tidewater Wildlife Rescue for emergencies at 757-255-8710 or the Wildlife Response Hotline at 757-543-7000.

https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/nuisance/

Show All Answers

1. Where can I purchase a dog license?
2. Are cats required to be licensed?
3. What if I or someone I know are missing a pet?
4. Does the Animal Service Bureau take care of spiders, mice, lizards, or flying and buzzing insect pests?
5. What do I do if I find a dead animal?
6. What do I do if I am bitten by an animal?
7. What do I do it my pet bites someone?
8. What is rabies?
9. Can humans have rabies?
10. What can I do to help control rabies?
11. Who is responsible for enforcing wildlife related laws?
12. What if I experience nuisance wildlife at my home or in my area?
13. Is caring for injured or orphaned wildlife a good idea?